fleurghost:

only reblogging for the leo poster

phyllos:

similar here 
(q’d - have a good day cutie x)

phyllos:

similar here 

(q’d - have a good day cutie x)

(via rcah)

Jimmy Page photographed at Bath Pavillion, UK, March 13, 1971.

(via i-cant-quit-you-jimmy)

NOX (architecture by Lars Spuybroek)
H20 (saltwater/freshwater) Pavilion, 1997
interactive installation,
Rotterdam, Holland.
"Architecture Liquide - NOX, Freshwater pavilion" (1998) - photo by Neeltje Jans
© NOX Architecture / /Neeltje Jans

boyirl:

Jose Ignacio Romussi Murphy

eyes 

embroidery on photo///////

 

foto*** Amanda Charchian

(via rcah)

psychedelicway:

The Royal Albert Hall, 14 November 1967

(via everybodyneedspinkfloyd)

mpdrolet:

Prosthetic eye, Cancer Research Center, Texas, c. 1969-70

Paul Almasy

(via villenoire)

woodysblues:

Gilmour & Barrett, The Madcap Laughs
“[Pink Floyd] were pulling their hair out, they decided to bring in another guitarist to complement, so Syd wouldn’t have to play guitar and maybe he’d just do the singing. Dave Gilmour came in and they were a five-piece for about four or five weeks. It got better because Dave was together in what he did. Then the ultimate decision came down that if they were going to survive as a band, Syd would have to go. Now I don’t know whether Syd felt it and left, or whether he was asked to. But he left. Dave went through some real heavy stuff for the first few months. Syd would turn up at London gigs and stand in front of the stage looking up at Dave; ‘That’s my band.’”— Jerry Shirley
“In my memory, work on [Barrett’s solo album The Madcap Laughs] had stopped, and they were going to dump the album. They’d spent too much time and money getting just half-a-dozen or so tracks. Syd asked if I could help him and I said, sure. So I went to EMI and asked for some more studio time to complete the album.” — David Gilmour
“Syd looked up to Dave. I think, despite everything, he trusted him. It was arduous making The Madcap Laughs, but therapeutic for them both.”— Jenny Spires, on Gilmour helping Barrett go solo
“Syd would have all these anarchic changes in metre, things I’d never be brave enough to do. I loved it. That line in Octopus, ‘Little minute gonk coughs/Clears his throat’. I could play it perfectly well because I knew that when the words finish the chord changes. I followed it on the drums in an unlearned way. He certainly had a bent towards making the words take over. It was part of what made him so exciting and original.
- - It was murder, murder, trying to get him to do anything. He was usually on Mandrax, and would sit on a stool then fall off it. You can practically hear him fall asleep on some of the takes. But I always felt there was a part of him that wasn’t impaired, that knew what was going on. - - He functions on a totally different plane of logic, and some people will claim, ‘Well yeah man he’s on a higher cosmic level’ - but basically there’s something drastically wrong. It wasn’t just the drugs - we’d both done acid before the whole Floyd thing - it’s just a mental foible which grew out of all proportion.”— David Gilmour
“By that time, you didn’t know if he was playing with you.” — Duggie Fields
“I gave him a lift back to Earls Court when we’d finished the album. I went up to his flat with him in this rickety little lift with the iron gates you draw across. As we got to his floor, he turned to me, looked me in the eye, and said, quietly, ‘Thank you.’ - - I don’t know what Syd thinks or how he thinks. Sure, I’d be into going back into the studio with him, but I’m into projects like that anyway. Period.”— David Gilmour, 1974
woodysblues:

Gilmour & Barrett, The Madcap Laughs
“[Pink Floyd] were pulling their hair out, they decided to bring in another guitarist to complement, so Syd wouldn’t have to play guitar and maybe he’d just do the singing. Dave Gilmour came in and they were a five-piece for about four or five weeks. It got better because Dave was together in what he did. Then the ultimate decision came down that if they were going to survive as a band, Syd would have to go. Now I don’t know whether Syd felt it and left, or whether he was asked to. But he left. Dave went through some real heavy stuff for the first few months. Syd would turn up at London gigs and stand in front of the stage looking up at Dave; ‘That’s my band.’”— Jerry Shirley
“In my memory, work on [Barrett’s solo album The Madcap Laughs] had stopped, and they were going to dump the album. They’d spent too much time and money getting just half-a-dozen or so tracks. Syd asked if I could help him and I said, sure. So I went to EMI and asked for some more studio time to complete the album.” — David Gilmour
“Syd looked up to Dave. I think, despite everything, he trusted him. It was arduous making The Madcap Laughs, but therapeutic for them both.”— Jenny Spires, on Gilmour helping Barrett go solo
“Syd would have all these anarchic changes in metre, things I’d never be brave enough to do. I loved it. That line in Octopus, ‘Little minute gonk coughs/Clears his throat’. I could play it perfectly well because I knew that when the words finish the chord changes. I followed it on the drums in an unlearned way. He certainly had a bent towards making the words take over. It was part of what made him so exciting and original.
- - It was murder, murder, trying to get him to do anything. He was usually on Mandrax, and would sit on a stool then fall off it. You can practically hear him fall asleep on some of the takes. But I always felt there was a part of him that wasn’t impaired, that knew what was going on. - - He functions on a totally different plane of logic, and some people will claim, ‘Well yeah man he’s on a higher cosmic level’ - but basically there’s something drastically wrong. It wasn’t just the drugs - we’d both done acid before the whole Floyd thing - it’s just a mental foible which grew out of all proportion.”— David Gilmour
“By that time, you didn’t know if he was playing with you.” — Duggie Fields
“I gave him a lift back to Earls Court when we’d finished the album. I went up to his flat with him in this rickety little lift with the iron gates you draw across. As we got to his floor, he turned to me, looked me in the eye, and said, quietly, ‘Thank you.’ - - I don’t know what Syd thinks or how he thinks. Sure, I’d be into going back into the studio with him, but I’m into projects like that anyway. Period.”— David Gilmour, 1974

woodysblues:

Gilmour & Barrett, The Madcap Laughs

“[Pink Floyd] were pulling their hair out, they decided to bring in another guitarist to complement, so Syd wouldn’t have to play guitar and maybe he’d just do the singing. Dave Gilmour came in and they were a five-piece for about four or five weeks. It got better because Dave was together in what he did. Then the ultimate decision came down that if they were going to survive as a band, Syd would have to go. Now I don’t know whether Syd felt it and left, or whether he was asked to. But he left. Dave went through some real heavy stuff for the first few months. Syd would turn up at London gigs and stand in front of the stage looking up at Dave; ‘That’s my band.’
— Jerry Shirley

“In my memory, work on [Barrett’s solo album The Madcap Laughs] had stopped, and they were going to dump the album. They’d spent too much time and money getting just half-a-dozen or so tracks. Syd asked if I could help him and I said, sure. So I went to EMI and asked for some more studio time to complete the album.” — David Gilmour

“Syd looked up to Dave. I think, despite everything, he trusted him. It was arduous making The Madcap Laughs, but therapeutic for them both.”
— Jenny Spires, on Gilmour helping Barrett go solo

“Syd would have all these anarchic changes in metre, things I’d never be brave enough to do. I loved it. That line in Octopus, ‘Little minute gonk coughs/Clears his throat’. I could play it perfectly well because I knew that when the words finish the chord changes. I followed it on the drums in an unlearned way. He certainly had a bent towards making the words take over. It was part of what made him so exciting and original.

- - It was murder, murder, trying to get him to do anything. He was usually on Mandrax, and would sit on a stool then fall off it. You can practically hear him fall asleep on some of the takes. But I always felt there was a part of him that wasn’t impaired, that knew what was going on. - - He functions on a totally different plane of logic, and some people will claim, ‘Well yeah man he’s on a higher cosmic level’ - but basically there’s something drastically wrong. It wasn’t just the drugs - we’d both done acid before the whole Floyd thing - it’s just a mental foible which grew out of all proportion.”
— David Gilmour

“By that time, you didn’t know if he was playing with you.” — Duggie Fields

“I gave him a lift back to Earls Court when we’d finished the album. I went up to his flat with him in this rickety little lift with the iron gates you draw across. As we got to his floor, he turned to me, looked me in the eye, and said, quietly, ‘Thank you.’
- - I don’t know what Syd thinks or how he thinks. Sure, I’d be into going back into the studio with him, but I’m into projects like that anyway. Period.”
— David Gilmour, 1974

(via everybodyneedspinkfloyd)